Friday, February 26, 2016

Calculating a cord of wood

The Canadian Educator for Home and School Use.  Toronto:  The Iroquois Press, 1932.
J.L. Nichols,  A.M.  The Business Guide; ...or...Safe Methods of Business.  Standard Edition.  Naperville, Illinois:  J.L. Nichols & Company, 1906.  First copyright 1886.
J.L. Nichols,  A.M.  The Business Guide; ...or...Safe Methods of Business.  Standard Edition.  Naperville, Illinois:  J.L. Nichols & Company, 1906.  First copyright 1886.

As my primary heat source is firewood, this information is actually still handy!  Well, maybe not the rate per cord.

It's interesting that, in the second example above, stove wood was calculated differently than fire wood. I don't know where the "divide by 32" rule comes from. Seems like a rip-off to me.  Also, notice the "cord foot" in the top illustration.  It measured 4' X 1' X 4', equivalent to 1/8 of a full cord, or 16 cubic feet.  I haven't seen this unit used in my neck of the woods. In contrast, folks around here do sell "face cords" which measure 4' X 8' X 16", equivalent to 1/3 of a full cord or 42.6 cubic feet.

1 comment:

David Blackburn said...

Face cord is pretty common terminology here as well, often called simply "a cord", which it isn't. Perhaps that comes from the stove wood concept of a 20" (or less) deep pile.